Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Saturday, 07 / 04 / 2020

Articles

Abstract

Abstract

As of today, March 30, 2020, when this Editorial is being written, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), causal agent of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been confirmed in more than 745,000 cases worldwide and has claimed the lives of more than 35,000 people.1 In addition to the morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19, this betacoronavirus has placed several of the world’s major economies in strife, mainly in Western Europe and North America, paralyzing travel and regular social interactions, making COVID-19 undoubtedly one of the most important pandemics in human history.

While we are in the midst of battling this pandemic, we have already learned some lessons from a cruel teacher: a) the importance of a strong association that must exist between governments and the scientific community in implementing a broad range of measures to contain and, in the future, prevent this type of epidemic; b) the potential for this pandemic to indirectly, due to less available resources, increase liver-related outcomes morbidity and mortality, including liver transplantation; c) the necessity to develop new working practices in multidisciplinary teams that will provide appropriate levels of care for patients from intensive care units to the outpatient setting. COVID-19 may make virtual clinic visits through telemedicine the norm and not the exception in some parts of the world. However, there are many questions that have yet to be answered. One of the most important to resolve is the understanding of the devastating impact of SARS-CoV-2 in specific geographic regions, such as Spain and Italy.

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