Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

Monday, 03 / 30 / 2020

Articles

Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance and Atherogenic Dyslipidemia in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

REVIEW ARTICLE

Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance and Atherogenic Dyslipidemia in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Daud H. Akhtar1, Umair Iqbal*,2, Luis Miguel Vazquez-Montesino3, Brittany B. Dennis4,5 and Aijaz Ahmed5

1Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver BC, Canada
2Department of Medicine, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Danville, PA, USA
3Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
4Department of Medicine, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton ON, Canada
5Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

*Correspondence to: Umair Iqbal, Department of Medicine, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Danville, PA 17821, USA. Tel: +1-570-271-6211, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2019;7(4):362-370 DOI: 10.14218/JCTH.2019.00028
Received: July 8, 2019 Accepted: November 8, 2019 Published online: November 29, 2019

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the developed world, with a global prevalence of around 25%. NAFLD is considered to be the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Insulin resistance plays a pivotal role in the development of NAFLD-related dyslipidemia, which ultimately increases the risk of premature cardiovascular diseases, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with NAFLD. Insulin affects hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism by hepatic or extrahepatic pathways. Aside from insulin resistance, several other factors also contribute to the pathogenesis of atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with NAFLD. These include diet composition, gut microbiota and genetic factors, to name a few. The identification of potentially modifiable risk factors of NAFLD is of importance, so as to target those who may benefit from lifestyle changes and to help develop targeted therapies that decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with NAFLD.

Keywords

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, Insulin resistance, Cardiovascular diseases, Dyslipidemia

 

 

 

 

Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology 2019 vol. 7, 362-370  [ Html ] [ PDF Full-text ]

© The Authors 2019. This article is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and is otherwise in compliance with the license.

 

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